Summer Grilling Tips

The delicate balance of hot and cool, the height of the flame and the distance from the sun. When you fire
up the grill, you’re creating your own cooking universe. You are truly the master, controlling the fiery sun
and strategically placed meat planets for optimal cook times and temperatures. Okay, so maybe it’s not that
extreme, but cooking too close or too far away from your heat source can ruin a perfectly well-planned dinner. Check out these tips for setting up your coals and recommended methods for popular cuts.

Start Fresh

Remove any existing ash from your grill as debris can block vents needed to control temperature. Clean grates with a wire brush to remove any residue.

 

Create Your Heat Source

Chimney starters are an easy and efficient way to light your charcoal briquettes. Just follow these easy instructions:
• Flip chimney over and place pieces of newspaper in the bottom
• Fill chimney with charcoal (a standard chimney will hold 100 briquettes. You’ll only need about half than that 3-4 individual cuts)
• Light newspaper with matches through the
vents in the chimney
• Wait until the charcoal has turned to white
ash and dump into grill.

 

 

 

 

Arrange the Coals

There are a few great ways to create heat zones on your grill. You’ll want to have an area where meat can be cooked directly over the flame and an area where meat can be moved if it’s getting too charred or requires a longer cook time. If you stack coals in the middle of your grill, make sure you’re leaving enough room around the outside
for a cool resting place (8-10 inches)

Use Your Thermometer

Even the most experienced grillers don’t head for the yard without a trusty meat thermometer. Follow these easy guidelines for the perfectly cooked centerpiece. Remember, pork is best and can be served a little on the pink side. Especially if sourced from a trusted, local retailer.

Recipe: Chorizo Breakfast Scramble

Ingredients

  • 10 eggs
  • 1 lb. Kettle Club Bulk Mexican chorizo
  • 1 small white onion
  • 2 plum tomatoes
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 tbsp cooking oil
  • 2 to 16 corn or flour tortillas

Instructions

  1. Finely chop the onion, tomato and garlic
  2. Crack the eggs into a mixing bowl and beat with a fork for 30 seconds
  3. Preheat a large frying pan to medium
  4. Add the cooking oil and the onion to the frying pan and cook for 1 minute
  5. Add the tomato and garlic, stir and cook for 1 minute
  6. Crumble the chorizo into the frying pan. Cook for about 5 minutes until most of the fat from the chorizo has cooked off
  7. Pour the eggs into the chorizo, onion, tomato, garlic mixture. Let the eggs set for 1 minute then gently stir the mixture.
  8. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the eggs are just cooked
  9. While the eggs are still cooking, heat the tortillas on a griddle or in the oven 10. Top with cheese and serve with warm tortillas

 

Bulk vs. Links: A Case for Uncased Sausage

The carnivorous controversy continues. Patty or link? Crumble or morsel? On a bun, or free to swim in a sea of al dente noodles? While we adore both, we’re sharing some benefits to liberating ground pork from the confines of the case. Here’s some reasons to let that sausage run wild and free.

Caramelization 

Caramelization is the process of applying heat to sugar thus changing the chemical composition. The reaction unlocks richer, nuttier flavors and textures in your favorite foods. The more surface area your cooking subject has, the more caramelization. This is why some prefer the sticky sweetness of a morning sausage patty to a cased link.

Versatility 

From pizza and pasta, to dips and patties, a crumbly, uncased sausage ensures you’ll get a little delicious heritage pork in every bite. No more skating around those inferior pizza toppings to get to the good stuff.

Calories Lost 

We’re not one to make a “case” for removing delicious fat from heritage pork. But we don’t judge the paper towel blotters either. Some studies have shown that you can cut up to 20 calories per serving just by removing a little excess oil from your dinner plate. Sausage casing seals up the fat inside, which means you won’t get much of a blot from a linked sausage. So blot away, physically fit pork eaters!

We love them both! 

Our opinion? They’re both equally delicious and each has its own shining moments at your dinner table, cookout or breakfast feast. But this month we’ll enjoy the uncased deliciousness of Bulk Sweet Italian.

Recipe: Boneless Pork Chop Brine Bath

Nothing loosens up those stiff muscles quite like a soak in the tub. Pork chops would agree! Before you toss this month’s featured boneless pork chop on the grill, let it unwind in a relaxing brine bath. Simply put, a brine is a liquid solution that includes salts. The salt helps break up protein or muscle fibers resulting in a juicer, more flavorful chop. Check out this great brine recipe!

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 1/2cup boiling water 3 ½ cups cold water
  • 2 boneless pork chops
  • 1/4 teaspoon vegetable oil

Directions:

  1. Combine salt, molasses, cloves, and boiling water in a large container. Stir until molasses and salt are dissolved; let cool to room temperature.
  2. Pour cold water into molasses mixture; stir to combine.
  3. Completely submerge pork chops in molasses mixture. Cover container and refrigerate for 6 hours.
  4. Remove pork chops from brine and pat dry with paper towels. Lightly oil each chop.
  5. Preheat an outdoor grill for medium-high heat and lightly oil the grate. Place pork chops on the hottest part of the grill; cook each side until browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a medium-high area of the grill and cook pork until it is slightly pink in the center, 6 to 8 minutes per side. An instant read thermometer inserted into the center of the chop should read 145 degrees F.